Press Releases / Pressemitteilungen

Shell Increases Versatility of Nanowires

Laboratory experiments show that semiconductor nanowires can be tuned over wide energy ranges

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Cross-section of a nanowire featuring a gallium arsenide core, an indium aluminum arsenide shell, and an indium gallium arsenide capping layer (gallium is shaded blue, indium red and aluminum cyan). For comparison, the white bar indicates a scale of 30 nanometers. The image was produced by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Source: HZDR/René Hübner

Press release by Helmholtz Center Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR) of June 26, 2019

[Deutsche Version unter "read more"]

Nanowires promise to make LEDs more colorful and solar cells more efficient, in addition to speeding up computers. That is, provided that the tiny semiconductors convert electric energy into light, and vice versa, at the right wavelengths. A research team at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) has managed to produce nanowires with operating wavelengths that can be freely selected over a wide range – simply by altering the shell structure. Fine-tuned nanowires could take on several roles in an optoelectronic component, without having to resort to different materials. That would make the components more powerful, more cost-effective, and easier to integrate, as the team reports in Nature Communications (doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-10654-7).

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Marcus Regime in Organic Devices: Interfacial Charge Transfer Mechanism Verified

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Device schematics. a – Schematic cross section of the device. b – Hot-electron transistor operation. Electrons are injected by applying a negative emitter-base bias, and detected in the molecular semiconductor. These electrons are out of equilibrium with the thermal electrons in the base which cannot be described by a larger temperature. The measurements can be performed either without or with externally applied collector-base bias.

[Deutsche Version unter "read more"]

Physicists from the Research Cluster Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) of the TU Dresden, together with researchers from Spain, Belgium and Germany, were able to show in a study how electrons behave in their injection into organic semiconductor films. Simulations and experiments clearly identified different transport regimes. The study was published now in Nature Communications.

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Organic Solar Cells and Light-emitting Diodes United: TUD Physicists Enlighten Us

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Current-voltage characteristic of an organic optoelectronic diode that absorbs ultraviolet and blue photons. Below the open-circuit voltage the diode functions as a solar cell and above as an OLED. The molecular structures show the charge carrier distribution in the organic semiconductors used: BF-DPB (electron donor) and B4PYMPM (electron acceptor). Visualisation by Dr. Reinhard Scholz and Matteo Cucchi.

(Press release from TU Dresden; Deutsche Version unter "read more")

In the past 25 years of research on organic semiconductors, it was thought that organic solar cells and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) could not be combined in a single device. A team of physicists headed by Prof. Koen Vandewal from Technische Universität Dresden has now succeeded in manufacturing an organic solar cell that simultaneously functions as an efficient OLED. Their findings were recently published in the internationally renowned journal Nature Materials.


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Startschuss für das Forschungslabor Mikroelektronik Dresden am cfaed-Kooperationsinstitut NaMLab

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Im ForLab DSCT der TU Dresden werden Anlagen für die interdisziplinäre Erforschung von Schaltungen aus Nanodrähten aufgebaut. (Quelle: TU Dresden/IHM)

[Pressemitteilung der TU Dresden]

Am 5.2.2019 erhält die TU Dresden die Förderurkunde für ihr „Forschungslabor Mikroelektronik Dresden für rekonfigurierbare Elektronik" (ForLab DCST) vom Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF). Insgesamt starten zwölf Forschungslabore Mikroelektronik Deutschland (ForLab). Das Dresdner Forschungslabor wird bis Ende 2021 mit 5,61 Mio. Euro gefördert und übernimmt die Koordination aller zwölf Forschungslabore.

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Invisible tags: Physicists at TU Dresden write, read and erase with the use of light

Published on in PRESS RELEASES

A luminescent tag, contactless printed onto a plastic foil. The light emitting layer is thinner than a human hair. The imprint can be erased and replaced by another pattern. Image credit: M. Gmelch and H. Thomas, TU Dresden

A team of physicists headed by Prof. Sebastian Reineke of TU Dresden developed a new kind of storing information in fully transparent plastic foils. Their innovative idea is now published in the renowned online journal “Science Advances”.

Prof. Reineke and his LEXOS team work with simple plastic foils with a thickness of less than 50 µm, which is thinner than a human hair. In these transparent plastic foils, they introduced organic luminescent molecules. In the beginning, these molecules are in an inactive, dark state. Using ultraviolet irradiation, it is possible to turn this dark state locally into an active, luminescent one. By mask illumination or laser writing, activated patterns can be printed into the foil having a resolution comparable to common laser printers. Similar to glow-in-the-dark stickers, the patterns can be brought to shine and the imprinted information can be read out. By illuminating with infrared light, the tag is erased completely and new data can be written into it.

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